• How China Upended Life at India's Ship-Recycling Yards

    At the world's biggest ship-recycling yard at Alang, India, life is becoming harder as fewer ships arrive. Here's why. Photo: Karan Deep Singh/The Wall Street Journal Subscribe to the WSJ channel here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Follow WSJ on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/wsjvideo Follow WSJ on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+wsj/posts Follow WSJ on Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJvideo Follow WSJ on Instagram: http://instagram.com/wsj Follow WSJ on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/wsj/

    published: 05 Sep 2016
  • Chinese shipyard ranks world′s number 5 for first time

    조선 빅5 세계시장 독식 시대 끝났다…중국 첫 진입 Korean shipbuilders once dominated the global market. Emphasis on ONCE. Times appear to be changing. The global shipping industry has been in a slump... and while Korean shipbuilders have been struggling to stay afloat amid falling orders and massive losses,... Chinese players are making their way into the ranks of the industry′s elite. Kim Min-ji sheds light on the signs of a possible dethronement in the works. Are Korean shipbuilders′ golden days almost over? For the first time ever,... a Chinese shipyard has broken into the top five global players in terms of order backlog. According to UK-based Clarkson Research Services,... Shanghai Waigaoqiao Shipbuilding had an order backlog in November of just over three million compensated gross tons,... an indicator ...

    published: 29 Dec 2015
  • Toxic Shipbreaking in India and China

    A report on how ships are broken down for scrap in shipyards in China and India. The story features interviews with activists who believe workers at these shipyards are unknowingly exposed to toxic waste. Reporter/Producer: Susan Yu India Fixer/Producer: Vyanjana Omer Broadcast: STAR TV Focus Asia 2000

    published: 10 Apr 2013
  • Turkey's massive ship recycling program

    In Aliaga, Turkey, large ships from around the world are dismantled, and the steel is recycled and sent to mills.

    published: 19 Oct 2011
  • The Dark side of the Shipping Industry - Ship Breakers

    In a nut shell, 'ship breaking' is where large numbers of used ships are sent to developing countries like China, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Turkey, they are systematically broken down by the cheap labor hired by these ship breakers. Workers are not trained, they are not supplied PPE and they get paid about $1 per day to work 12 hours every day, 7 days a week. Also see images from the Global Logistics Media Image Page : http://www.globallogisticsmedia.com/articles/view/take-a-glimpse-into-the-dark-side-of-the-shipping-industry---ship-breakers Video Courtesy of Vega Productions

    published: 17 Apr 2013
  • World's biggest ship breaking yard

    Ship breaking is one of the most hazardous jobs in the world because most ships are used to carry radioactive materials, toxic wastes, extremely poisonous chemicals and oil. Not only does it directly affect the health of the workers, it is an environmental time bomb - as workers strip the ships marooned on the sea shore, there is severe contamination of the sea bed, eventually seeping into the marine food chain. We visit the world's biggest ship breaking yard, Alang.

    published: 08 Mar 2011
  • Ship Breaking by Demolition Shear

    Le Telegramme report on a ship breaking project - the demolition shear was manufactured by Zato. Engineering Services (London) Ltd. are proud to announce that we are the new UK and Ireland agents for the Zato range of recycling equipment. Cayman Demolition Shears are now available to order from Engineering Services (London) Ltd. For more information please contact us by telephone on 01656 747720 or by email at engineeringserviceslondon@yahoo.co.uk. http://www.engineeringserviceslondon.co.uk/newstock.htm

    published: 14 Sep 2012
  • Gadani Ship Breaking Yard Incident

    Tuesday, November 1, 2016 Reportedly, the labourers were working on an unused oil tanker when the incident occurred. The local administration has also sought assistance from the Karachi fire brigade authorities to control the situation. Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif expressed deep grief over the incident and directed the concerned authorities to speed up rescue operation. Gadani ship-breaking yard is the world‘s third largest ship breaking yard. The yard consists of 132 ship-breaking plots located across a 10 km long beachfront at Gadani. Explore The World! PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE VIDEOS Subscription Link: https://goo.gl/eIOq7S

    published: 01 Nov 2016
  • Final destination: Ferry crashes into ship-breaking yard in Turkey

    Courtesy Salim San. The moment of a cross-channel ferry's seafaring days came to a grinding halt. The ship sailed between Dover and Calais for 22 years. What is in the news today? Click to watch: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLSyY1udCyYqBeLGPTLVZMp8kczDH7_5Ni euronews: the most watched news channel in Europe Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronews euronews is available in 14 languages: https://www.youtube.com/user/euronewsnetwork/channels In English: Website: http://www.euronews.com/news Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/euronews Twitter: http://twitter.com/euronews Google+: http://google.com/+euronews VKontakte: http://vk.com/en.euronews

    published: 29 Jan 2014
  • World's biggest ship breaking yard in Alang, Gujarat | Akalangalile India 12 Oct 2016

    World's biggest ship breaking yard in Alang, Gujarat | Akalangalile India 12 Oct 2016 Click Here To Free Subscribe! ► http://goo.gl/Y4yRZG Website ► http://www.asianetnews.tv Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/AsianetNews Twitter ► https://twitter.com/asianetnewstv Pinterest ► http://www.pinterest.com/asianetnews Vine ► https://www.vine.co/Asianet.News

    published: 12 Oct 2016
  • All Star Metals - Ship Recycling Facility - Brownsville, TX

    A overview of All Star Metals. A US Ship recycler located in Brownsville, TX.

    published: 10 Sep 2016
  • Ship Breaking Yard Alang

    Alang ship breaking yard, live video ship breaking at yard, india

    published: 28 Dec 2016
  • The Ship Breakers of Bangladesh: VICE INTL

    There aren't too many places left in the world where the practice of ship breaking—scrapping old ships for metal—can still exist. These days, environmental and labor regulations in the developed world have displaced the practice to India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan, where cargo carriers are salvaged for their steel. The largest vessels wind up on the shores of the city of Chittagong in Bangladesh, where the industry has become a vital part of the country's urbanization. It employs roughly 200,000 workers and supplies the country with 80 percent of its steel. Ship breakers beach and dismantle vessels daily wearing flip­-flops and T-shirts. It's no easy task, considering ships are constructed to withstand the elements for the 30 years they spend operating on international waters. We decided t...

    published: 09 Feb 2015
  • Shipbreakers

    This feature documentary profiles a bustling Indian shantytown where 40,000 people live and work in the most primitive conditions.

    published: 21 Jun 2017
  • Ship Breakers | Bangladesh

    Broadcast: 17 February 2013 on Sunday Night, Seven Network, Australia. It's one of the most jaw-dropping sights of the modern world. For as far as the eye can see, along a stretch of coastline in Bangladesh, hundreds of mammoth supertankers lie beached on the sand. This is where the world's ships come to die. Tim joins the thousands of workers, some of them children, who are paid just 47 cents a day to break up these rusting giants with their bare hands. AWARDS: Winner: Walkley Award for Camerawork, Australia (2013) CREW: Reporter / Camera: Tim Noonan Producer: Ali Russell Sound: Dan Abbott Editor: Jimmy Hamilton SUBSCRIBE: Youtube ► http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=timnoonantv SOCIALS: Facebook ► http://facebook.com/timnoonantv Instagram ► http://instagram.com/timn...

    published: 16 Jul 2013
  • Echoes of Ship Breaking

    The bothering heat and shouts of his Mukadam mingles with the echoes of machine and men usually 30 to 70 feet below him. He has to silence it all when he turns on his blow torch and focuses solely on weakening the structure of the very ship he stands on; right now he is working on the metal holdings around the mast. He stands away cautiously as the weakened mast is hooked on to a whinge and it's pulled down. The bulking mast hits the bottom of the hull, the boom reaches his ears and touches his skin, it reminds him a little bit of his village, of his childhood, when he would drop a metal bucket in well to collect water. With no time for nostalgia he gets back to cutting another part of the hull, he does this every day for 8-10 hours; his safety net is his experience. He is one of the 66,00...

    published: 17 Jul 2014
How China Upended Life at India's Ship-Recycling Yards

How China Upended Life at India's Ship-Recycling Yards

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:49
  • Updated: 05 Sep 2016
  • views: 12190
videos
At the world's biggest ship-recycling yard at Alang, India, life is becoming harder as fewer ships arrive. Here's why. Photo: Karan Deep Singh/The Wall Street Journal Subscribe to the WSJ channel here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Follow WSJ on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/wsjvideo Follow WSJ on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+wsj/posts Follow WSJ on Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJvideo Follow WSJ on Instagram: http://instagram.com/wsj Follow WSJ on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/wsj/
https://wn.com/How_China_Upended_Life_At_India's_Ship_Recycling_Yards
Chinese shipyard ranks world′s number 5 for first time

Chinese shipyard ranks world′s number 5 for first time

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:21
  • Updated: 29 Dec 2015
  • views: 1547
videos
조선 빅5 세계시장 독식 시대 끝났다…중국 첫 진입 Korean shipbuilders once dominated the global market. Emphasis on ONCE. Times appear to be changing. The global shipping industry has been in a slump... and while Korean shipbuilders have been struggling to stay afloat amid falling orders and massive losses,... Chinese players are making their way into the ranks of the industry′s elite. Kim Min-ji sheds light on the signs of a possible dethronement in the works. Are Korean shipbuilders′ golden days almost over? For the first time ever,... a Chinese shipyard has broken into the top five global players in terms of order backlog. According to UK-based Clarkson Research Services,... Shanghai Waigaoqiao Shipbuilding had an order backlog in November of just over three million compensated gross tons,... an indicator of the level of shipbuilding ouput. That puts the Chinese company in fifth place. All of the top five positions had been held by Korean shipbuilders until now. Ranking first was Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering with eight-point-two million CGTs,... followed by Samsung Heavy Industries with just over five million. Korean shipbuilders have been engaging in belt-tightening measures after posting eye-watering losses in recent months,... mainly brought on by delayed construction, cancelled orders,... as well as rising costs and low global oil prices. Korea′s ″big three″ logged a combined loss of over four billion dollars in the first half of the year. Even more concerning is that prospects aren′t looking good for next year either. ″The difficult situation they′re in will continue into 2016. There′s two main factors that will have an effect oil prices and global cargo volume. Only when oil prices start to pick up,... will the industry hope to see recovery signs.″ Analysts say that in order to maintain competitivness... local shipbuilders need to focus on their core strengths... rather than expand their business,... like branching off into construction of offshore plants where they lack experience. They add that the government will need to help small shipbuilders,... as it′s only a matter of time before Chinese shipyards catch up. Kim Min-ji, Arirang News. Visit ‘Arirang News’ Official Pages Facebook(NEWS): http://www.facebook.com/newsarirang Homepage: http://www.arirang.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangtv Twitter: http://twitter.com/arirangworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/arirangworld
https://wn.com/Chinese_Shipyard_Ranks_World′S_Number_5_For_First_Time
Toxic Shipbreaking in India and China

Toxic Shipbreaking in India and China

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:54
  • Updated: 10 Apr 2013
  • views: 2472
videos
A report on how ships are broken down for scrap in shipyards in China and India. The story features interviews with activists who believe workers at these shipyards are unknowingly exposed to toxic waste. Reporter/Producer: Susan Yu India Fixer/Producer: Vyanjana Omer Broadcast: STAR TV Focus Asia 2000
https://wn.com/Toxic_Shipbreaking_In_India_And_China
Turkey's massive ship recycling program

Turkey's massive ship recycling program

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:53
  • Updated: 19 Oct 2011
  • views: 49833
videos
In Aliaga, Turkey, large ships from around the world are dismantled, and the steel is recycled and sent to mills.
https://wn.com/Turkey's_Massive_Ship_Recycling_Program
The Dark side of the Shipping Industry - Ship Breakers

The Dark side of the Shipping Industry - Ship Breakers

  • Order:
  • Duration: 22:05
  • Updated: 17 Apr 2013
  • views: 106249
videos
In a nut shell, 'ship breaking' is where large numbers of used ships are sent to developing countries like China, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Turkey, they are systematically broken down by the cheap labor hired by these ship breakers. Workers are not trained, they are not supplied PPE and they get paid about $1 per day to work 12 hours every day, 7 days a week. Also see images from the Global Logistics Media Image Page : http://www.globallogisticsmedia.com/articles/view/take-a-glimpse-into-the-dark-side-of-the-shipping-industry---ship-breakers Video Courtesy of Vega Productions
https://wn.com/The_Dark_Side_Of_The_Shipping_Industry_Ship_Breakers
World's biggest ship breaking yard

World's biggest ship breaking yard

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:34
  • Updated: 08 Mar 2011
  • views: 425648
videos
Ship breaking is one of the most hazardous jobs in the world because most ships are used to carry radioactive materials, toxic wastes, extremely poisonous chemicals and oil. Not only does it directly affect the health of the workers, it is an environmental time bomb - as workers strip the ships marooned on the sea shore, there is severe contamination of the sea bed, eventually seeping into the marine food chain. We visit the world's biggest ship breaking yard, Alang.
https://wn.com/World's_Biggest_Ship_Breaking_Yard
Ship Breaking by Demolition Shear

Ship Breaking by Demolition Shear

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:12
  • Updated: 14 Sep 2012
  • views: 372493
videos
Le Telegramme report on a ship breaking project - the demolition shear was manufactured by Zato. Engineering Services (London) Ltd. are proud to announce that we are the new UK and Ireland agents for the Zato range of recycling equipment. Cayman Demolition Shears are now available to order from Engineering Services (London) Ltd. For more information please contact us by telephone on 01656 747720 or by email at engineeringserviceslondon@yahoo.co.uk. http://www.engineeringserviceslondon.co.uk/newstock.htm
https://wn.com/Ship_Breaking_By_Demolition_Shear
Gadani Ship Breaking Yard Incident

Gadani Ship Breaking Yard Incident

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:54
  • Updated: 01 Nov 2016
  • views: 26015
videos
Tuesday, November 1, 2016 Reportedly, the labourers were working on an unused oil tanker when the incident occurred. The local administration has also sought assistance from the Karachi fire brigade authorities to control the situation. Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif expressed deep grief over the incident and directed the concerned authorities to speed up rescue operation. Gadani ship-breaking yard is the world‘s third largest ship breaking yard. The yard consists of 132 ship-breaking plots located across a 10 km long beachfront at Gadani. Explore The World! PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE VIDEOS Subscription Link: https://goo.gl/eIOq7S
https://wn.com/Gadani_Ship_Breaking_Yard_Incident
Final destination: Ferry crashes into ship-breaking yard in Turkey

Final destination: Ferry crashes into ship-breaking yard in Turkey

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:02
  • Updated: 29 Jan 2014
  • views: 1323950
videos
Courtesy Salim San. The moment of a cross-channel ferry's seafaring days came to a grinding halt. The ship sailed between Dover and Calais for 22 years. What is in the news today? Click to watch: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLSyY1udCyYqBeLGPTLVZMp8kczDH7_5Ni euronews: the most watched news channel in Europe Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronews euronews is available in 14 languages: https://www.youtube.com/user/euronewsnetwork/channels In English: Website: http://www.euronews.com/news Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/euronews Twitter: http://twitter.com/euronews Google+: http://google.com/+euronews VKontakte: http://vk.com/en.euronews
https://wn.com/Final_Destination_Ferry_Crashes_Into_Ship_Breaking_Yard_In_Turkey
World's biggest ship breaking yard in Alang, Gujarat | Akalangalile India 12 Oct 2016

World's biggest ship breaking yard in Alang, Gujarat | Akalangalile India 12 Oct 2016

  • Order:
  • Duration: 18:34
  • Updated: 12 Oct 2016
  • views: 11332
videos
World's biggest ship breaking yard in Alang, Gujarat | Akalangalile India 12 Oct 2016 Click Here To Free Subscribe! ► http://goo.gl/Y4yRZG Website ► http://www.asianetnews.tv Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/AsianetNews Twitter ► https://twitter.com/asianetnewstv Pinterest ► http://www.pinterest.com/asianetnews Vine ► https://www.vine.co/Asianet.News
https://wn.com/World's_Biggest_Ship_Breaking_Yard_In_Alang,_Gujarat_|_Akalangalile_India_12_Oct_2016
All Star Metals - Ship Recycling Facility - Brownsville, TX

All Star Metals - Ship Recycling Facility - Brownsville, TX

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:13
  • Updated: 10 Sep 2016
  • views: 2053
videos
A overview of All Star Metals. A US Ship recycler located in Brownsville, TX.
https://wn.com/All_Star_Metals_Ship_Recycling_Facility_Brownsville,_Tx
Ship Breaking Yard Alang

Ship Breaking Yard Alang

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:43
  • Updated: 28 Dec 2016
  • views: 1972
videos
Alang ship breaking yard, live video ship breaking at yard, india
https://wn.com/Ship_Breaking_Yard_Alang
The Ship Breakers of Bangladesh: VICE INTL

The Ship Breakers of Bangladesh: VICE INTL

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:15
  • Updated: 09 Feb 2015
  • views: 505682
videos
There aren't too many places left in the world where the practice of ship breaking—scrapping old ships for metal—can still exist. These days, environmental and labor regulations in the developed world have displaced the practice to India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan, where cargo carriers are salvaged for their steel. The largest vessels wind up on the shores of the city of Chittagong in Bangladesh, where the industry has become a vital part of the country's urbanization. It employs roughly 200,000 workers and supplies the country with 80 percent of its steel. Ship breakers beach and dismantle vessels daily wearing flip­-flops and T-shirts. It's no easy task, considering ships are constructed to withstand the elements for the 30 years they spend operating on international waters. We decided to check it out. Click here to subscribe to VICE: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE Check out our full video catalog: http://bit.ly/VICE-Videos Videos, daily editorial and more: http://vice.com More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos Like VICE on Facebook: http://fb.com/vice Follow VICE on Twitter: http://twitter.com/vice Read our Tumblr: http://vicemag.tumblr.com Follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/vice
https://wn.com/The_Ship_Breakers_Of_Bangladesh_Vice_Intl
Shipbreakers

Shipbreakers

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:12:52
  • Updated: 21 Jun 2017
  • views: 1622
videos
This feature documentary profiles a bustling Indian shantytown where 40,000 people live and work in the most primitive conditions.
https://wn.com/Shipbreakers
Ship Breakers | Bangladesh

Ship Breakers | Bangladesh

  • Order:
  • Duration: 15:50
  • Updated: 16 Jul 2013
  • views: 531721
videos
Broadcast: 17 February 2013 on Sunday Night, Seven Network, Australia. It's one of the most jaw-dropping sights of the modern world. For as far as the eye can see, along a stretch of coastline in Bangladesh, hundreds of mammoth supertankers lie beached on the sand. This is where the world's ships come to die. Tim joins the thousands of workers, some of them children, who are paid just 47 cents a day to break up these rusting giants with their bare hands. AWARDS: Winner: Walkley Award for Camerawork, Australia (2013) CREW: Reporter / Camera: Tim Noonan Producer: Ali Russell Sound: Dan Abbott Editor: Jimmy Hamilton SUBSCRIBE: Youtube ► http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=timnoonantv SOCIALS: Facebook ► http://facebook.com/timnoonantv Instagram ► http://instagram.com/timnoonantv Website ► http://www.timnoonan.tv
https://wn.com/Ship_Breakers_|_Bangladesh
Echoes of Ship Breaking

Echoes of Ship Breaking

  • Order:
  • Duration: 36:58
  • Updated: 17 Jul 2014
  • views: 268882
videos
The bothering heat and shouts of his Mukadam mingles with the echoes of machine and men usually 30 to 70 feet below him. He has to silence it all when he turns on his blow torch and focuses solely on weakening the structure of the very ship he stands on; right now he is working on the metal holdings around the mast. He stands away cautiously as the weakened mast is hooked on to a whinge and it's pulled down. The bulking mast hits the bottom of the hull, the boom reaches his ears and touches his skin, it reminds him a little bit of his village, of his childhood, when he would drop a metal bucket in well to collect water. With no time for nostalgia he gets back to cutting another part of the hull, he does this every day for 8-10 hours; his safety net is his experience. He is one of the 66,000 workers who work on the ship breaking yards at Alang in Gujarat and Darukhana in Mumbai. They migrate from UP, Orissa, Bihar and various other states across India in search of employment and better life. The job of these workers is to strip the raw materials from these ships and sell them to various integral industries i.e. construction, steel mills, to name a few. The ship breaking industry as always been surrounded with myths and controversies. With many reports in the media mostly giving it a broad tag of "hazardous to environment" which is far from the truth, what ship-breaking actually does is reuse valuable raw materials striped from a dead ship, which would end up being more hazardous if left in the sea. The primary pressing issue of ship breaking which gets skirted is its workers. The process of ship-breaking requires workers from the start to the end. Often to skirt costs; untrained contractual workers will be hired, safety equipment will be ignored and benefits will be skimmed. In this documentary 'Echoes of Ship-Breaking' we'll be entering through the backdoor of the ship-breaking industry to see: • How the industry processes labour and ships • How ships are brought in and labourers are hired, and how it starts • The industry's questionable history regarding worker laws • Why and how ship breaking reached India • How ship breaking affects the environment • Breaking down the process of ship-breaking in India • Its contribution to India and the future of ship breaking in India
https://wn.com/Echoes_Of_Ship_Breaking